Participatory TV

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The Third Wave, The Fourth Screen, The Fifth Power, And Beyond

links for 2009-06-25

  • "A Spanish group called Labuat has created one of the most beautiful music videos we’ve ever seen. And the best thing is, it’s interactive! As the song — “Soy Tu Aire” (“I’m Your Air”) — kicks off, a line of black ink moves across the screen: You can send it up, down, back, and forth, or swirl it into circles. The line grows thicker along the way and splatters into several shapes: butterflies, red lips, birds. The immersive experience will make you feel like a maestro."
  • Highly recommended band from South Africa…
  • OK, last bit of Patrick-Meier-catch-up for today – all the notes from the Fletcher Summer Institute on the Advanced Study of Nonviolent Conflict (sorry, civil resistance…).
  • Patrick Meier's talking at this, and it seems really quite excellent – maybe next year…: "As cases of nonviolent conflict rise globally, it is ever more incumbent for NGOs, journalists, scholars, and policy makers to understand how this form of struggle works, the strategies that make it effective, and the skills involved in its execution. The Institute will address these and other critical questions: * What are the most important strategic considerations in nonviolent civil resistance? * What roles do media, communications and new technology play in nonviolent struggles? * How do the actions of external actors impact indigenous nonviolent movements?"
  • Nokia Siemens Networks' response to try to set the record straight on the Iran intercept capability… and 141 people comment.
  • As thoughtful as ever from Jan Chipchase, and interesting sidenotes on the NSN/Iran Intercept controversy: "We've come across this issue in field studies to probe technology adoption in countries such as Brazil, India, USA and, yes Iran. When the research has been difficult to justify internally I've initiated and funded exploration into Tibet, Mongolia, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan to name a few destinations. The research has covered participants right across the social and income spectrum including communities that don't, or until recently didn't appear on any map – places at the edge of the grid, be they unpaved, un-sewered, un-electrified or un-networked. The level of ingenuity we've encountered in these places have often surprised us and the stories that we heard from 'everyday' people often left us humbled."
  • Bill Mitchell breaks the Neda story arc into its constituent parts: "Journalists have relied on a process approach to writing for years. The Next Step Journalism process practiced on the Neda story began with an event and is characterized by the collective sharing and enhancing of information. Such a process provides lots of opportunities for journalists and non-journalists alike to assess what a story needs next, figure out what he or she is best equipped to contribute, and move the story along. Deconstructing the Neda story reveals seven elements of this kind of storytelling — some more in need of professional journalism skills and values than others. In describing what's involved in each elements, I'm struck by a common thread: the importance of collaboration."
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links for 2009-06-23

  • This is a pretty brilliant idea – before we get lost in a technophilic fog about Twitter, let's remember that revolutions, uprisings and the like have lots of methods of organising and communicating, and that tech changes and moulds around these methods. The scope and scale and viralness of these methods is now global and instant due to tech, but what we need to examine is whether/how methods of organising are changing because of these – not debating whether Twitter is the best thing in the world, EVER, and anyone who says different is a fool and a Canute.
  • "State security services lag behind Silicon Valley in digital innovation but they are capable of it when the pressure is on. Other regimes will learn lessons from the Iran debacle and are likely to be better prepared for the next twitterised revolution."
  • Adam Curtis is increasingly using the internet as his primary medium. I hesitate to call him the Chris Marker of our time, but maybe that's what he could be. I'm looking forward to following the journey, anyhow. Interesting that the time of the tinkerers seemed to be past, and here it is again, facilitated by the BBC's blogs…
  • Here's the full text of that speech. And an extract: "No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don't want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life's change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true."
  • "Remembering I'll be dead soon is the most important tool I've ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart." Steve Jobs…
  • Excellent, brief and pointed article from Bobbie Johnson about the need for more scrutiny of the role of technology companies in facilitating (and sometimes actively promoting) repressive technologies. Here's a quote he takes from a recent WaPo article: "Nokia Siemens Networks (NSN), a joint venture between the Finnish cell-phone giant Nokia and German powerhouse Siemens, delivered what is known as a monitoring center to Irantelecom, Iran's state-owned telephone company. A spokesman for NSN said the servers were sold for "lawful intercept functionality," a technical term used by the cell-phone industry to refer to law enforcement's ability to tap phones, read e-mails and surveil electronic data on communications networks." I'd predict a knock at the door of the Global Network Initiative. And doesn't Siemens have a little bit of form in this area?

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links for 2009-06-18

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links for 2009-06-15

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links for 2009-06-10

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links for 2009-06-08

  • "In our research on civic groups that form spontaneously in the face of adversity, we have seen how people become — often against their will — interpellated into activities like fact-finding, document digging, attending public hearings, and public story telling, activities that overlap with many of the those practiced by investigative or beat journalists. We met one software engineer who was working to protect his suburb from corporate development and pollution; he was genuinely upset because he had been written up in a local paper with the caption "activist" under his photo. He told us, "I'm not an activist, I'm a software engineer!" Unwilling or not, in many cases these activists are the ones following an issue and documenting it for the public record." Christopher Csikszentmihályi on information and activism.

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links for 2009-06-03

  • "We're convinced that the best way to ensure the future of journalism is to create a workable model where journalists are paid well for reporting here and abroad. And that starts with paying for the physical paper. And paying for the physical paper begins with creating a physical object that doesn't retreat, but instead luxuriates in the beauties of print. We believe that if you use the hell out of the medium, if you give investigative journalism space, if you give photojournalists space, if you give graphic artists and cartoonists space— if you really truly give readers an experience that can't be duplicated on the web— then they will spend $1 for a copy. And that $1 per copy, plus the revenue from some (but not all that many) ads, will keep the enterprise afloat."
    (tags: journalism)

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links for 2009-06-02

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links for 2009-05-31

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